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The Prepper’s Guide to Foraging

The Prepper's Guide to Foraging
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The Prepper’s Guide to Foraging is not a plant identification guide in the traditional sense. It is instead a guide to using plants to supplement other means of food production and subsistence living. Author David Nash believes that there is not enough land available for to support a large-scale return to the hunter-gatherer lifestyle in the event of a large-scale disaster, but that botanical knowledge does provide an edge to the well prepared.

This book advocates the acquisition of knowledge to allow its reader to safely identify, harvest, and use common North American plants. Wild plants can provide shelter, material, medicine, and food to help the reader extend stored food as well as to create items that may be otherwise unavailable during a crisis.

Twenty-five easily identified plants common to the United States are described and illustrated with notations for their common usage. Each plant described in this book comes with one recipe for food as well as detailed instructions for at least one alternative use. Additional instructions for the preparation of standard medicinal items like tinctures, creams, and infusions are included as well as botanical guides to help identify other plants is included. Special emphasis has been added for North American trees.

You can purchase this book on Amazon.


There is not enough land for every American to live a hunter/gatherer lifestyle, but understanding the uses of wild foods can definitely increase odds of survival during a large scale disaster.

This book uses both pictures and drawings to identify 25 common plants and give both food and additional uses for each.

I grew up the son of a park ranger, and spent much of my youth running around in the woods of Tennessee eating berries and gnawing on twigs.

I remember a severe whupping I received once when my father discovered chicory root in his coffee maker.  He was quite adamant that If I wanted to poison myself I could, but I could not put wild things in his food.

However, in my defense, he was fine.  He only discovered the coffee substitute when he threw out the grounds – which means my experiment was a success.  Painful, yes, but a success nonetheless.  In case you are wondering, I don’t drink coffee, so I felt there was no need to actually try it myself.

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